Native American Creation and Destruction
By: Cam Scott
Native American groups of the Northwest Coast of the United States and Canada create carved and painted logs of wood called totem poles. The animals and spirits on these poles often come from Native American myths and folktales.
Native American groups of the Northwest Coast of the United States and Canada create carved and painted logs of wood called totem poles. The animals and spirits on these poles often come from Native American myths and folktales.


There are man different stories to the creation and destruction of the world.

An Algonquin Legend

The Great Earth Mother had two sons, Glooskap and Malsum. Glooskap was good, wise, and creative; Malsum was evil, selfish, and destructive.
When their mother died, Glooskap went to work creating plants, animals, and humans from her body. Malsum, in contrast, made poisonous plants and snakes.
As Glooskap continued to create wonderful things, Malsum grew tired of his good brother and plotted to kill him.
In jest, Malsum bragged that he was invincible, although there was one thing that could kill him: the roots of the fern plant.
He badgered Glooskap for days to find the good brother's vulnerability. Finally, as Glooskap could tell no lies, he confided that he could be killed only by an owl feather. Knowing this, Malsum made a dart from an owl feather and killed Glooskap.
The power of good is so strong, however; that Glooskap rose from the dead, ready to avenge himself. Alive again, Glooskap also knew that Malsum would continue to plot against him.
Glooskap realized that he had no choice but to destroy Malsum in order that good would survive and his creatures would continue to live. So he went to a stream and attracted his evil brother by loudly saying that a certain flowering reed could also kill him.
Glooskap then pulled a fern plant out by the roots and flung it at Malsum, who fell to the ground dead. Malsum's spirit went underground and be-came a wicked wolf-spirit that still occasionally torments humans and animals, but fears the light of day.
For many centuries, Native Americans have passed their myths from generation to generation though oral stones and artistic repesentations. This mural painting shows a scene from the Hopi people
For many centuries, Native Americans have passed their myths from generation to generation though oral stones and artistic repesentations. This mural painting shows a scene from the Hopi people



A woman is pregnant for four years and finally gives birth to a boy with supernatural powers. He demonstrates how he can have his head pulled off and then restore it, be turned to a heap of bones and come back to life, etc. The boy has an altercation with a chief, whom he kills. The warriors pursue him, but he kicks over a cooking pot onto a fire and rises up in the smoke. The warriors spy him far off, but no matter how fast they go they can never get any closer (rather as in the Celtic tale in which Arthur first sees Gwladys, and a similar tale of the Buddha). The boy appears before them in various guises on a mountain-top before disappearing into a magical entrance in its side. Inside the mountain he meets a group of wise old men who instruct him for four years and give him a sacred arrow bundle. He goes back to his tribe and becomes their prophet and counsellor, and saves them from famine, magically restoring the buffalo.





http://www.firstpeople.us/FP-Html-Legends/AlgonquinCreationMyth-Algonquin.html
http://www.mythencyclopedia.com/Mi-Ni/Native-American-Mythology.html